Template for Collaborative Unit Plan – A.3.2

Planning
· Grade Level: Seventh grade
· Content Areas: Language Arts, Social Studies
· Lesson/Unit Length: 3 lessons. The first lesson in the library and two followup lessons in the classroom.
· Purpose : Students will be able to view events from different perspectives, to be alert to stereotyping and false representation of a culture, and to become more active and critical readers.
· Objectives
Students will discuss Cinderella archetype and compare/contrast Cinderella stories across cultures. Students will present their findings. Create a multimedia in a multimedia presentation of their findings.

  • Resources, Materials, and Equipment: Box with manipulatives, clipart pictures, screen or TV to show video
Reel Grrls "Cinderella Updated." YouTube. Web. 24 Jul 2010. http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=95553&title=Cinderella_Updated


Children’s or Young Adult Literature
Climo, Shirley, The Egyptian Cinderella. New York: Harper Collins, 1989.
Coburn, Jewel Reinhart, Domitila: a Cinderella tale from the Mexican tradition. California: Shen's Bks., 2000.
Greene, Ellen, Billy Beg and his bull: an Irish tale. New York: Holiday House, 1994.
Hicox, Rebecca. The Golden Sandal: A Middle Eastern Cinderella Story. Illustrated by Will Hillenbrand. 1999.
Marshall, Bonnie, The snow maiden and other Russian folktales. Connecticut: Libraries Unlimited, 2004.
Mayer, Mariana, Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the Brave. New York: Morrow Junior Bk., 1994.
Perrault, Charles, Perrault's complete fairy tales. New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1961.
San Souci, Robert. (written and illustrated by) Sootface: An Ojibwa Cinderella Story. 1997.
Sierra, Judy. The Gift of the Crocodile: A Cinderella Story. Illustrated by Ruffins, Reynold. 2000.

For a complete list of recommended resources go to Cinderella Stories

Other Resources
Dundes, Alan. Cinderella: A Folklore Casebook. New York, New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1982.
In this academic study, Dundes explores the popularity and global reach of Cinderella stories with chapters that include the texts of particular Cinderella variations, as well as chapters on unifying themes, folklore studies, and close readings of gender, psychology, and linguistics.

Encyclopedia of World Cultures. New York: Marshall Cavendish, 1998.
There are 10 volumes of the encylopedia to explore different cultures. Topics covered for each group include history, location, religious beliefs and practices, arts, socio-political organization, language, economy, family, and kinship relationships
.
Goodwin, Katherine. In Search of Cinderella: A Curriculum for the 21st Century. Fremont California: Shen's Books, Inc., 2000.
This book is a curriculum for teachers providing activities, information, and lesson plans on Cinderella stories from across the globe. Goodwin addresses twelve Cinderella stories from India, Russia, Mexico, Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and the United States. The approach of the curriculum material is geared toward reading and writing proficiency, gender issues, multiculturalism, values, social studies, research, and geography.

Man, Myth & Magic: the Illustrated Encyclopedia of Mythology, Religion and the Unknown. New York: Marshall Cavendish,1985.
The set is designed to provide an "unbiased exploration" into the religions and cultures of the world, past and present, and their belief systems. There are 20 volumes for researching a particular religion, culture, or mythical subject The student.will be able to trace aspects of the topic throughout the encyclopedia volumes.

Sierra, Judy. Cinderella:The Oryx Multicultural Folktale Series. Phoenix, Arizona: The Oryx Press, 1992.
This anthology of Cinderella tales includes 25 versions of the Cinderella story from cultures all over the world, including Europe, Africa, Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas. A glossary to the tales, as well as a section on essays, activities, and issues are found at the back of the book.

Websites -
Washington State University: World Civilizations : link to website for student research of cultures.
Exploring Ancient World Cultures: an Introduction to Ancient World Cultures on the World Wide Web : link to website for student research of cultures.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinderella a Wikipedia article that compares several versions of Cinderella, including both Grimm and Perrault's versions
http://nancykeane.com/rl/322.htm a brief list of Cinderella versions, organized by continent.
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0510a.html a very complete Cinderella website hosted by the University of Pittsburgh
http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=95553&title=Cinderella_Updated a video made by middle school students in teacher tube
http://www.learner.org/interactives/story/index.html interactive educational video programs with coordinated Web and printed materials.
http://teachwithpicturebooks.blogspot.com/2010/02/cinderella-tale-mirror-of-culture.html Cinderella variant book resources.
http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/offices/publishing/booklinks/resources/multicultural.cfm Additional Cinderella variant book resources.

Graphic Organizers

Materials
Equipment: Presentation cart, chart paper, easel, markers
· Collaboration: Teacher and librarian will jointly plan, librarian will find resources and teacher will support students research while in the classroom.
· Assessment: rubric, student presentation, student reflective
paper

· Standards
Reading and/or writing
TEK 9A. Compare and contrast the stated or implied purposes of different authors writing on the same topic.
TEK 10A. Evaluate a summary of the original text for accuracy of the main ideas, supporting details, and overall meaning.
TEK 10D. Synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres, and support those findings with textual evidence.
TEK 17C. Write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate.
TEK 17D. Produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology.

Listening and speaking
TEK 27A. Present a critique of a literary work, film, or dramatic production, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, a variety of natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

Other content areas
Research TEKS
TEK 22B apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.
TEK 23A follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies.
TEK 23B categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information.
TEK 23C record bibliographic information (e.g.,author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format.
TEK 26D differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.
TEK 24A narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation.
TEK 24B utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used(e.g.,publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another.
TEK 25A draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way.
TEK 25B marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions.
TEK 25C presents the findings in a meaningful way.
TEK 25D follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas.
Social Studies TEKS
TEK19. Culture: the student understands the notion of diversity. The student is expected to:
B) Describe how people from various racial, ethnic and religious groups attempt to maintain their cultural heritage.
TEK 21. Social Studies Skills. The student applies critical thinking skills to organize and use information. The student is expected to:
B) Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.
D) Identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants.

AASL S4L
1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
1.1.6 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.
1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
1.3.2 Seek divergent perspectives during information gathering and assessment.

Educational technology
Computer with output to screen

Implementation
· Process:
Day 1: The librarian will introduce Cinderella by displaying items one at a time from a "book talk box" reflecting story elements from the fairytale. The "book talk box" includes: a pumpkin, a mouse, a magic wand, an apron, a piece of coal, a glass slipper, and a clock set to 12:00. She will prompt students to guess the fairytale in which these items will appear while retelling parts of the story. The classroom teacher will be constructing a chart that will finally reveal the entire "traditional" version of the tale. The librarian will display and booktalk the other versions of the Cinderella story. The initial readings (read-aloud by librarian) would focus on the "enjoyment" and comprehension of the literature.
The librarian and the classroom teacher would ask the students to complete a KWHL chart on each of the following prior to the introduction of each Cinderella version from the country/culture: Russia, Ireland, Egypt, Mexico, Middle East, Native American, Indonesia.external image pdf.png KWHL chart.pdf
The classroom teacher and the librarian will explain to students that they will be reading many different versions of Cinderella. The classroom teacher and librarian will model and guide students in their culture research.These versions reflect different cultures and students are to view the books as "artifacts" from those cultures. Using these "artifacts" students are to be investigative reporters as they gather information about the cultures from the print and images, categorize and synthesize that information, and compare what they find to factual information sources to determine how reliable each piece of literature is in reflecting a particular culture.
Day 1: The librarian will introduce Cinderella by displaying items one at a time from a "book talk box" reflecting story elements from the fairytale. The "book talk box" includes: a pumpkin, a mouse, a magic wand, an apron, a piece of coal, a glass slipper, and a clock set to 12:00. She will prompt students to guess the fairytale in which these items will appear while retelling parts of the story. The classroom teacher will be constructing a chart that will finally reveal the entire "traditional" version of the tale. The librarian will display and booktalk the other versions of the Cinderella story. The initial readings (read-aloud by librarian) would focus on the "enjoyment" and comprehension of the literature.
The librarian and the classroom teacher would ask the students to complete a KWHL chart on each of the following prior to the introduction of each Cinderella version from the country/culture: Russia, Ireland, Egypt, Mexico, Middle East, Native American, Indonesia.external image pdf.png KWHL chart.pdf
The classroom teacher and the librarian will explain to students that they will be reading many different versions of Cinderella. The classroom teacher and librarian will model and guide students in their culture research.These versions reflect different cultures and students are to view the books as "artifacts" from those cultures. Using these "artifacts" students are to be investigative reporters as they gather information about the cultures from the print and images, categorize and synthesize that information, and compare what they find to factual information sources to determine how reliable each piece of literature is in reflecting a particular culture.
Day 2: The librarian would chose another Cinderella variant to read aloud to the students while the teacher would model how to locate and record the information in the story elements chart. Students would read each book outlined for this lesson. The teacher and librarian would vary this reading by whole group, small group or partner reading.
After the initial reading students would re-read the literature (partners/small group) recording the following criteria in a chart: book title, characters, trouble makers, helpers, why chosen, magical events, and ending. (classroom teacher and librarian will monitor the small groups) The teacher and librarian would read a different Cinderella variant while modeling how to locate the information in the literature and record the information in the surface culture chart. (co-teaching)(teacher reads aloud and librarian records on chart)
Students would re-read the literature (partners/small group) recording the following criteria in a surface culture chart: food, dress, music, language, celebrations, and architecture. (classroom teacher and librarian monitor small groups)
The teacher and librarian would once again read a different Cinderella variant while modeling how to locate the information in the literature and record the informaton in the deep culture chart. (co-teaching)(librarian reads aloud and teacher records on chart)
Students would re-read the literature(partners/small group) recording criteria in a deep culture chart: concept of beauty, family structure, courtship practice, work ethic, expressions of humor, body language, societal roles as determined by age, societal roles as determined by class, societal roles as determined by sex, and values. (classroom teacher and librarian will monitor small groups) external image msword.png Deep Culture Chart.doc
Day 3: Students will take turns sharing their presentation.
Motivation: Students will be intrinsically motivated by the novelty of the lesson, as well as extrinsically motivated by a grade.Teacher will start the lesson with one shoe only and start asking to students if they have seen her shoe, then post a poster witha reward for whoever finds her shoe. Students might guess that she is "Cinderella"

Student-friendly Objectives:
*Student will compare and contrast culturally appropriate literature from around the world.
*Student will analyze and discuss resources.
*Student will make a presentation of literary works.

Presentation - Teacher and librarian will present the initial lesson modeling, sharing and taking turns for students.
First class: Librarian will introduce lesson using realia and pictures, librarian will read some of the books in the resource list and share the whole list with students in a display. Students will have as homework to review all resources and fill graphic organizers.
Second class:Librarian and teacher are reading a Cinderella variant and modeling how to fill out the graphic organizers. Students will bring their homework and discuss cultural differences/similarities, characters, plotlines, etc. Students will select partners to make a group, then find 2 new resources and make a presentation, preferably multimedia. The librarian and classroom teacher will monitor progress in small group and give guidance.
Third class: Students will share their presentation with the class and return their rubric to the teacher.

Student Participation Procedures or Student Practice Procedures
*Students will raise their hand to ask for a turn to speak during teacher or librarian presentation.
*Students will work cooperatively in small groups.
*Students will not interrupt other student's presentations.
*Students will use regular library procedures when researching for their own resources.
*Finished product should be free of mistakes, according to seventh grade writing expectations.
Guided Practice
Teacher and librarian will present the initial lesson modeling, sharing and taking turns for students.
Librarian and teacher are reading a Cinderella variant and modeling how to fill out the graphic organizers.
Students will work in teams of two (or three) and make a power point presentation that includes graphics and text and present it in front of the class.
The librarian and the classroom teacher will monitor their comprehension and performance in small groups.

Closure
Students as a class will participate with reflections on the pervasiveness of the Cinderella archetype across cultures.
Reflection
As a class, students will participate with their thoughts and ideas of Cinderella stories in real life and the media.
Questions that may be used as ice breakers include:
What personal traits does the Cinderella character have?
Is magic really necessary for the Cinderella story?
What ending do you prefer, regarding the stepsisters and stepmother?
Why do you think this story evolved? what was it designed to teach? is it still relevant to this day?
· Extensions: Students can pick a favorite Cinderella variant and retell it by acting it out. (drama) Students may write their own version of Cinderella.

Adapted from: Moreillon, J. Collaborative strategies for teaching reading comprehension: Maximizing your impact. Chicago: ALA Editions, 2007.